Published: Sat, February 25, 2017
National | By Miranda Cannon

Temperature records fall as Northeast gets a taste of spring

Temperature records fall as Northeast gets a taste of spring

That beat the previous record of 65, which was set in 1990.

Shortly after 1 p.m. Friday, the temperature in Buffalo, N.Y., hit 71 degrees, according to the National Weather Service, in the latest sign of the mild, even warm, winter that much of the eastern U.S.is experiencing.

It's been a record warm winter's day in parts of southern New England.

By midday, Boston had also hit 71 - also a record.

Temperatures reached 68 degrees, the National Weather Service announced Friday.

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Only twice in Buffalo's recorded weather history has the temperature reached 70 degrees in Buffalo in February. Colder air is headed to the region for the weekend, but it will still be warmer than normal. This month, the average high has been 43 and average low, 25.3 degrees. Some might also see it as an unnerving sign of a warming planet.

That figure slipped to just 0.02 percent as of Thursday's data by the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

Although those predicted highs likely won't approach records, Lipton said, they're still above-average for February.

In the last week of February 1906, it was booming - it was, at the time, one of the biggest cities in the nation. At the time, local news included an inquiry into reports of fish being dynamited in the Niagara River, the newspaper says.

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